Believing What My Eyes Can’t See

fog-240075_1920If you’ve ever seen any of the Indiana Jones’ movies, you know Indy is always in search of a treasure. Although he’s never seen these treasures, he still believes in their existence. He risks life and limb based on a word he heard about something he’s never seen. This fictional action hero is a prime illustration of the type of faith that pleases God. The Bible says, “It’s impossible to please God without faith” (Hebrews 11:6). Conversely, our faith is typically lacking because we can’t envision what God is going to do. The passage of time can cause doubt to seep into your thoughts and spill out into your speech. Imagine what God could do in your life if you exercised an Indiana Jones’ kind of faith.

If we’re honest, when we get behind closed doors, and we’ve taken our church face off, and we’re alone with our thoughts, there’s a nagging question that lingers in the back of our minds.  How can I believe God when my circumstances are in direct opposition to God’s promises? There are three principles I believe can help us see beyond our natural vision. The first thing we need to understand is that the invisible is birthed through the eyes of faith (Hebrews 11:1-3). What is faith? It’s a firm belief in something for which there is no visible proof. That’s why God says faith is the substance of things hope for, the evidence of things not seen. It’s a confident expectation that what I’m hoping for will happen. I’m believing for things that have already been completed in the supernatural realm. If you can see it, then you don’t need faith.

The word substance in Hebrews 11:1 means support. Faith provides support for what you can’t see. Faith makes things possible, not easy. When time and circumstance begin to chip away at your faith you must hold fast to God’s promises. Filter your problem through His Word. Time is the gestational period during which you must nourish your faith with scripture so that the content of your faith becomes the Word of God. Remember, God’s Word can’t return to Him void (Isaiah 55:11).

 Another principle to remember is that where your faith is directed dictates how far you can see. Ever notice how God always calls you to do things where you lack the ability and resources to accomplish them? You’re afraid to move because you don’t have the money, or the help, or the education, or the skills. I don’t know about you, but there are some things God has asked me to do that have challenged my faith because I just can’t see how in the world it’s going to happen. It’s difficult to move in faith when you don’t see any visible means of support.

Focusing on your situation is what I call misdirected faith. We have more faith in the problem than what God says about the problem. When your faith gets misdirected, remind yourself you don’t have to see it to believe it (John 20:29). It’s like driving a car or a riding a bike. You turn the wheel in the direction you want the vehicle to go. When you direct your faith on God, you can see your way past the problem. Faith transports you from the natural to the supernatural and causes you to have double vision. In the natural, double vision signals a problem. But double vision is needed for your Christian walk. It allows you see your situation from a dual perspective. While you acknowledge the reality of your situation, you direct your spiritual eyes on God and what He has declared about you. Faith connects you to every promise in the Bible. It empowers you to see your situation from God’s perspective. You see yourself healed despite the doctor’s report. You see yourself going back to school and getting your degree in spite of your age or lack of financial ability. You see yourself doing what you never dreamed you could do.

The last principle to remember is to express your faith through your actions. Faith in Hebrews 11:1 means to be persuaded and have confidence in God’s divine truths, to the point it moves you to act on that truth. The root word for faith means to induce one by words to believe. God rewards those who diligently seek Him (Hebrews 11:6).

In one of Indiana Jones’ movies, our hero finally discovers what he’s been searching for, but a great abyss stands between Him and the reward. There is no visible path to the promise. It wasn’t until he stepped out into the invisible, that the path to the treasure opened. It’s not enough to just say I believe God. You have to act like you believe. Faith is expressed through actions. If you’re scared, then do it scared. You’ve been waiting for God to show you a sign, and God has been waiting for you to take the first step. God sees your need, but He responds to your faith. When you move in faith God releases the reward.

God is a God of principles. When you put His principles into practice, He moves on your behalf. Faith is the bridge between need and provision. Rest your faith in God’s Word and not what you see, how you feel, what you think, or what you’re going through. God rewards those who trust Him despite what they’re natural eyes see.

Until next time…Be blessed!

Rev. Cynthia Jackson
Rhema Inspirations

P.S. We’d love to hear from you. Drop us a line and let us know if this post has been a blessing to you.

Rev. Cynthia Jackson is the administrator of the Rhema4U Blog and the Program Manager of Innovations Ministries. Rev. Jackson is a native of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She was licensed and ordained under the tutelage of Bishop David G. Evans. She is an associate minister at Bethany Baptist Church located in Lindenwold, New Jersey. Rev. Jackson founded Innovations Ministries in 2001. Innovations Ministries provides dynamic and innovative programs and services for individuals and families dealing with various health-related issues. She is a gifted teacher, preacher, conference speaker and writer. God has anointed Rev. Jackson to be a spiritual midwife with a passion to empower others to birth God's vision for their lives. Rev. Jackson holds a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Organizational Management from Eastern University, a Master of Science Degree in Health Administration from Saint Joseph's University and a Master of Science Degree in Christian Counseling from Cairn University. Reverend Jackson resides in Clementon, New Jersey.

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